A Near-Perfect Offer-to-Acceptance Ratio? Absolutely!

In my previous two blog posts, I explored the subject of compensation and how it should be dealt with during the placement process:

“4 Numbers Clients Should Know Before Making an Offer”

“When Client and Candidate Discuss Money, It Means . . .”

In these posts, I’ve emphasized the fact that recruiters need to make sure that they’re properly positioned within the process and that their role is clearly defined, especially in the eyes of the hiring manager.

If they are, then they’ll be seen as a trusted adviser by both the candidate and the client.  If they’re seen as a trusted adviser by the candidate and the client, then there’s no reason that the candidate should turn down their client’s offer at the end of the deal.

And THAT’S why recruiters should have a near-perfect offer-to-acceptance ratio.

REMEMBER: If your client issues an offer that is turned down by your candidate, you have NOT correctly performed your function in the process.

No excuses accepted.  You have not properly selected and/or served your client.  Other than “acts of God,” when an offer is turned down, everybody loses.  If, based upon your proper positioning in the process, you determine that the offer is not going to be accepted, do not allow it to be issued.

One of the earmarks of a true professional in this business is a near-perfect offer-to-acceptance ratio.  A true professional knows the importance of making certain that no offer will be extended until an acceptance is assured.

That’s one of the major benefits for a client in working with a professional recruiter.  It’s also a strong indication that your processes are designed to serve the best interests of everyone involved.

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Terry Petra is one of the recruiting industry’s leading trainers and business consultants.  A Certified Personnel Consultant since 1975 and a Certified International Personnel Consultant since 1989, Petra has extensive experience as a producer, manager, and trainer in all areas of professional search, including retainer, contingency, and contract, as well as clerical/office support and temporary.  For more information about his services, visit his website or call 651.738.8561.